Commit e7666870 authored by Jean-Christophe Filliâtre's avatar Jean-Christophe Filliâtre
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doc: typos

parent 5542328b
...@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ length. The \texttt{use import List} command indicates that this new ...@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ length. The \texttt{use import List} command indicates that this new
theory may refer to symbols from theory \texttt{List}. These symbols theory may refer to symbols from theory \texttt{List}. These symbols
are accessible in a qualified form, such as \texttt{List.list} or are accessible in a qualified form, such as \texttt{List.list} or
\texttt{List.Cons}. The \texttt{import} qualifier additionally allows \texttt{List.Cons}. The \texttt{import} qualifier additionally allows
use to use them without qualification. us to use them without qualification.
Similarly, the next command \texttt{use import int.Int} adds to our Similarly, the next command \texttt{use import int.Int} adds to our
context the theory \texttt{int.Int} from the standard library. The context the theory \texttt{int.Int} from the standard library. The
...@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ containing theory \texttt{Int}. Theories referred to without prefix ...@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@ containing theory \texttt{Int}. Theories referred to without prefix
either appear earlier in the current file, \eg\ \texttt{List}, or are either appear earlier in the current file, \eg\ \texttt{List}, or are
predefined. predefined.
The next declaration defines a recursive function, \emph{length}, The next declaration defines a recursive function, \texttt{length},
which computes the length of a list. The \texttt{logic} keyword is which computes the length of a list. The \texttt{logic} keyword is
used to introduce or define both function and predicate symbols. used to introduce or define both function and predicate symbols.
\why\ checks every recursive, or mutually recursive, definition for \why\ checks every recursive, or mutually recursive, definition for
...@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ declarations of another theory, coming either from the same input ...@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ declarations of another theory, coming either from the same input
text or from the library. Another way to referring to a theory is text or from the library. Another way to referring to a theory is
by ``cloning''. A \texttt{clone} declaration constructs a local by ``cloning''. A \texttt{clone} declaration constructs a local
copy of the cloned theory, possibly instantiating some of its copy of the cloned theory, possibly instantiating some of its
abstract (i.e.~declared but not defined) symbols. abstract (\emph{i.e.}~declared but not defined) symbols.
\begin{figure} \begin{figure}
\centering \centering
...@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ use of it (see Section~\ref{sec:drivers}). ...@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ use of it (see Section~\ref{sec:drivers}).
Notice an important difference between \texttt{use} Notice an important difference between \texttt{use}
and \texttt{clone}. If we \texttt{use} a theory, say and \texttt{clone}. If we \texttt{use} a theory, say
\texttt{List}, twice (directly or indirectly: e.g.~by \texttt{List}, twice (directly or indirectly: \emph{e.g.}~by
making \texttt{use} of both \texttt{Length} and making \texttt{use} of both \texttt{Length} and
\texttt{Sorted}), there is no duplication: there is \texttt{Sorted}), there is no duplication: there is
still only one type of lists and a unique pair still only one type of lists and a unique pair
...@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ this time we use the abstract order on the values of type ...@@ -194,7 +194,7 @@ this time we use the abstract order on the values of type
Now, we can instantiate theory \texttt{SortedGen} to any Now, we can instantiate theory \texttt{SortedGen} to any
ordered type, without having to retype the definition of ordered type, without having to retype the definition of
\texttt{sorted}. For example, theory \texttt{SortedIntList} \texttt{sorted}. For example, theory \texttt{SortedIntList}
makes \texttt{clone} of \texttt{SortedGen} (i.e.~copies its makes \texttt{clone} of \texttt{SortedGen} (\emph{i.e.}~copies its
declarations) substituting type \texttt{int} for type declarations) substituting type \texttt{int} for type
\texttt{O.t} of \texttt{SortedGen} and the default order \texttt{O.t} of \texttt{SortedGen} and the default order
on integers for predicate \texttt{O.(<=)}. \why\ will on integers for predicate \texttt{O.(<=)}. \why\ will
...@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ optional, if it is omitted, the name of the symbol is \texttt{List.$s$}. ...@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ optional, if it is omitted, the name of the symbol is \texttt{List.$s$}.
\item \texttt{use import List as L} --- every symbol $s$ from \item \texttt{use import List as L} --- every symbol $s$ from
\texttt{List} is accessible under the name \texttt{L.$s$}. It is also \texttt{List} is accessible under the name \texttt{L.$s$}. It is also
accessible simply as \texttt{$s$}, but only up to the end of the current accessible simply as \texttt{$s$}, but only up to the end of the current
namespace, e.g.~the current theory. If the current theory, that is the namespace, \emph{e.g.}~the current theory. If the current theory, that is the
one making \texttt{use}, is later used under the name \texttt{T}, one making \texttt{use}, is later used under the name \texttt{T},
the name of the symbol would be \texttt{T.L.$s$}. (This is why we the name of the symbol would be \texttt{T.L.$s$}. (This is why we
could refer directly to the symbols of \texttt{Order} in theory could refer directly to the symbols of \texttt{Order} in theory
...@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ this feature is rarely used. ...@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ this feature is rarely used.
We now consider another, slightly more complex example: to use \why\ We now consider another, slightly more complex example: to use \why\
to solve a little puzzle known as ``Einstein's logic to solve a little puzzle known as ``Einstein's logic
problem''\footnote{This was contributed by St\'ephane Lescuyer.}. problem''\footnote{This \why\ example was contributed by St\'ephane Lescuyer.}.
The problem is stated as follows. Five persons, of five The problem is stated as follows. Five persons, of five
different nationalities, live in five houses in a row, all different nationalities, live in five houses in a row, all
painted with different colors. painted with different colors.
......
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